Medline: 7964940

The abstract Journal of Clinical Oncology 12(11): 2254-2263, 1994. is available online.

The fulltext Journal of Clinical Oncology 12(11): 2254-2263, 1994. may be available online for subscribers.

Radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer: long-term results of 1,143 patients from a single institution.

Zincke H, Bergstralh EJ, Blute ML, et al.

Abstract:

Purpose:
To determine the efficacy and complication rate of radical prostatectomy (RP) as a treatment option for clinically localized prostate cancer (clinical stage < or = T2c).

Methods:
The study was a retrospective analysis of 1,143 consecutive patients (median age, 64 years; range, 38 to 79 y) who underwent RP at one institution (mean follow-up time, 9.7 years). Complications for this study population were compared with those of a contemporary group of 1,000 consecutive patients.

Results:
Of 1,143 patients, 83 (7%) had a low clinical stage (T1) and 160 (14%) had a low histologic grade (Gleason score < or = 3); 648 (57%) had a high clinical stage (T2b or T2c) and 204 (18%) had a high histologic grade (Gleason score > or = 7). Only 113 (10%) died of prostate cancer, and 177 (15%) developed metastasis. Adjuvant treatment (androgen deprivation or radiation therapy) was given in 197 (17%) patients (> or = pT3) and provided virtually identical results as without adjuvant treatment. The 10- and 15-year crude survival rates for 1,143 patients were 75% +/- 1.5% (SE) and 60% +/- 2.2%, respectively; the cause-specific survival rates were 90% +/- 1.1% and 83% +/- 1.9%, respectively; and the metastasis-free survival rates were 83% +/- 1.3% and 77% +/- 1.9%, respectively (398 men at risk at 10 years and 138 men at risk at 15 years). The 10-year survival rate for patients with Gleason score > or = 7 was 74% +/- 3.9%. Only tumor grade was a significant predictor for disease outcome. The hospital mortality rate decreased from 0.7% for the 1,143 study patients to 0% for the more recent 1,000 patients. Severe incontinence declined to 1.4% for the more recent 1,000 patients. Most patients who underwent RP were healthy (Charlson comorbidity index).

Conclusion:
Survival at 15 years was similar to the expected survival rate. Current morbidity and mortality rates associated with RP were extremely low. Thus, RP has been a viable management option for men with clinically localized prostate cancer who have a life expectancy of more than 10 years.


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