Medline: 7916038

The abstract Journal of Clinical Oncology 12(9): 1748-1753, 1994. is available online.

The fulltext Journal of Clinical Oncology 12(9): 1748-1753, 1994. may be available online for subscribers.

Phase II trial of paclitaxel in patients with progressive ovarian carcinoma after platinum-based chemotherapy: a Gynecologic Oncology Group study.

Thigpen JT, Blessing JA, Ball H, et al.

Abstract:

Purpose:
This Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) trial of paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Co, Princeton, NJ) as salvage therapy for recurrent epithelial carcinoma of the ovary sought to confirm activity reported previously. If positive, the trial was to serve as a basis for phase III trials of Taxol in combination with platinum compounds in first-line therapy.

Patients and Methods:
Patients with recurrent, persistent, or progressive ovarian carcinoma during or after platinum-based chemotherapy received Taxol 170 mg/m2 intravenously once over 24 hours every 3 weeks. All patients had measurable disease and received premedication (dexamethasone, diphenhydramine, and ranitidine) followed by Taxol.

Results:
Of 49 patients, 45 were eligible and assessable. Among 43 patients who were assessable for response, there were eight complete and eight partial responses (37%). The median progression-free interval was 4.2 months, and median survival 16 months. Among 27 resistant patients who progressed during or within 6 months of prior platinum-based therapy or had stable disease as the best response, five complete (18%) and four partial (15%) responses were observed (33%). The median progression-free interval was 4 months. Among 16 sensitive patients who responded and progressed more than 6 months after prior platinum-based treatment, three complete (19%) and four partial (25%) responses were observed (44%). The median progression-free interval was 4.9 months. Grade 4 neutropenia (< 500/microL), the most frequent and severe toxicity, occurred in 73% of patients. Other hematologic effects were less frequent and less severe. Cardiac problems and hypersensitivity reactions were observed in one patient each.

Conclusion:
Taxol is a highly active agent in ovarian carcinoma, even in patients who are clinically resistant to platinum-based chemotherapy, and produces frequent and severe, albeit manageable, myelosuppression. It is clearly active as salvage therapy for ovarian carcinoma.


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