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Adrenocortical Carcinoma Treatment (PDQ)

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General Information About Adrenocortical Carcinoma
Cellular Classification of Adrenocortical Carcinoma
Stage Information for Adrenocortical Carcinoma
Stage I Adrenocortical Carcinoma
Stage II Adrenocortical Carcinoma
Stage III Adrenocortical Carcinoma
Stage IV Adrenocortical Carcinoma
Recurrent Adrenocortical Carcinoma
Changes to This Summary (11/15/2012)
About This PDQ Summary
Get More Information From NCI

General Information About Adrenocortical Carcinoma

Incidence and Mortality

Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare tumor that affects only 0.72 persons per one million population. [1] Although it mainly occurs in adults, children can be affected, too. The median age at diagnosis is 46 years. Historically, only about 30% of these malignancies are confined to the adrenal gland at the time of diagnosis. [2] However, recently, more ACCs have been diagnosed at early states, most likely due to the widespread use of high-quality imaging techniques.

Prognostic Factors

Retrospective studies have identified the following three important prognostic factors: [3]

Patients who have low-grade tumors without evidence of invasion into local tissues or spread to lymph nodes have an improved prognosis. The role of other prognostic indicators is controversial.

Clinical Features

In approximately 60% of patients, symptoms related to excessive hormone secretion are the main reasons for seeking medical attention. Biochemical hormone testing reveals that up to 80% of tumors are functioning. The second most common symptoms at time of initial presentation are unspecific abdominal symptoms, such as abdominal pain or fullness. A small percentage of ACCs is incidentally discovered by imaging studies conducted for reasons other than potential adrenal disease.

Diagnosis

Initial evaluation should include careful endocrine studies to reveal any excessive hormone production by the tumor, which can serve as a tumor marker during therapy. Staging should include imaging of the primary site by computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen. In addition, a CT of the chest is necessary to assess potential lung metastasis. Although the use of positron emission tomography may be effective in identifying unsuspected sites of metastases, its role as a staging tool is unclear. The detection of metastatic lesions may allow effective palliation of both functioning and nonfunctioning lesions.

Prognosis and Survival

The most common sites of metastases are the lung, liver, peritoneum, and less commonly, the bones and major veins. Palliation of metastatic functioning tumors may be achieved by resection of both the primary tumor and metastatic lesions. Unresectable or widely disseminated tumors may be palliated by adrenolytic therapy with mitotane antihormonal drugs (i.e., ketoconazole and metyrapone), systemic chemotherapy, and/or radiation therapy. However, 5-year survival for patients with stage IV tumors is usually less than 20%. [2]

Although several studies have shown partial or even complete remission, there is no convincing evidence to date that systemic therapy will improve the survival duration of patients with adrenal cancer. Radical open surgical excision is the treatment of choice for patients with localized malignancies and remains the only method by which long-term disease-free survival may be achieved. [4] Overall 5-year survival is approximately 38% to 46%. [1] [2]

References:

  1. Bilimoria KY, Shen WT, Elaraj D, et al.: Adrenocortical carcinoma in the United States: treatment utilization and prognostic factors. Cancer 113 (11): 3130-6, 2008.
  2. Fassnacht M, Allolio B: Epidemiology of adrenocortical carcinoma. In: Hammer GD, Else T, eds.: Adrenocortical Carcinoma: Basic Science and Clinical Concepts. New York, Springer, 2010, pp 23-9.
  3. Miller BS, Gauger PG, Hammer GD, et al.: Proposal for modification of the ENSAT staging system for adrenocortical carcinoma using tumor grade. Langenbecks Arch Surg 395 (7): 955-61, 2010.
  4. Allolio B, Fassnacht M: Clinical review: Adrenocortical carcinoma: clinical update. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 91 (6): 2027-37, 2006.

Cellular Classification of Adrenocortical Carcinoma

Adrenocortical carcinoma can be classified into functioning and nonfunctioning tumors by clinical and biochemical assessment. Approximately 60% of adrenocortical carcinomas produce hormones. [1] The associated clinical syndromes include the following:

Biochemical assessment aims to detect increased levels of cortisol (24-hour urine, 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test, serum adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol), androgens (dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, testosterone), estrogens (estradiol) and mineralocorticoids (renin, aldosterone).

Pathology can differentiate high-grade and low-grade tumors according to the mitotic activity of the tumor. The differentiation of benign and malignant adrenocortical tumors can be achieved by determination of the Weiss score, which scores several histopathological criteria, including the following: [2]

References:

  1. Allolio B, Fassnacht M: Clinical presentation and initial diagnosis. In: Hammer GD, Else T, eds.: Adrenocortical Carcinoma: Basic Science and Clinical Concepts. New York, Springer, 2010, pp 31-47.
  2. Weiss LM, Medeiros LJ, Vickery AL Jr: Pathologic features of prognostic significance in adrenocortical carcinoma. Am J Surg Pathol 13 (3): 202-6, 1989.

Stage Information for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

There are several staging systems in use. The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system [1] is based on the following assessment:

The stage of adrenocortical carcinoma is determined by the size of the primary tumor, the degree of local invasion, and whether it has spread to regional lymph nodes or distant sites. Proper staging should include computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and chest. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may add specificity to CT evaluation of an adrenal mass. [2] In-phase and out-of-phase T1-weighted imaging may be the most effective noninvasive method to differentiate benign from malignant adrenal masses. MRI may suggest evidence of extracapsular tumor invasion, extension into the vena cava, or metastases. Patency of surrounding vessels can often be demonstrated with gadolinium-enhanced sequences or flip-angle techniques. [3]

In addition to the above-mentioned AJCC staging, the European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumors (ENSAT) staging system is widely used internationally. [4] The ENSAT staging system is essentially the same as the AJCC system, but reserves stage IV only for tumors with distant metastasis. Other staging systems include the classical Macfarlane system, modified by Sullivan, and the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer staging system, published by the World Health Organization. [5]

Definitions of TNM

The AJCC has designated staging by TNM to define adrenocortical carcinoma. [1]

Table 1. Primary Tumor (T)a

TXPrimary tumor cannot be assessed.
T0No evidence of primary tumor.
T1Tumor ≤5 cm in greatest dimension, no extra-adrenal invasion.
T2Tumor >5 cm, no extra-adrenal invasion.
T3Tumor of any size with local invasion, but not invading adjacent organs.b
T4Tumor of any size with invasion of adjacent organs.b
aReprinted with permission from AJCC: Adrenal. In: Edge SB, Byrd DR, Compton CC, et al., eds.: AJCC Cancer Staging Manual. 7th ed. New York, NY: Springer, 2010, pp 515-20.
bAdjacent organs include kidney, diaphragm, great vessels, pancreas, spleen, and liver.

Table 2. Regional Lymph Nodes (N)a

NXRegional lymph nodes cannot be assessed.
N0No regional lymph node metastasis.
N1Metastases in regional lymph node(s).
aReprinted with permission from AJCC: Adrenal. In: Edge SB, Byrd DR, Compton CC, et al., eds.: AJCC Cancer Staging Manual. 7th ed. New York, NY: Springer, 2010, pp 515-20.

Table 3. Distant Metastasis (M)a

M0No distant metastasis.
M1Distant metastasis.
aReprinted with permission from AJCC: Adrenal. In: Edge SB, Byrd DR, Compton CC, et al., eds.: AJCC Cancer Staging Manual. 7th ed. New York, NY: Springer, 2010, pp 515-20.

Table 4. Anatomic Stage/Prognostic Groupsa

StageTNM
IT1N0M0
IIT2N0M0
IIIT1N1M0
T2N1M0
T3N0M0
IVT3N1M0
T4N0M0
T4N1M0
Any TAny NM1
aReprinted with permission from AJCC: Adrenal. In: Edge SB, Byrd DR, Compton CC, et al., eds.: AJCC Cancer Staging Manual. 7th ed. New York, NY: Springer, 2010, pp 515-20.

References:

  1. Adrenal. In: Edge SB, Byrd DR, Compton CC, et al., eds.: AJCC Cancer Staging Manual. 7th ed. New York, NY: Springer, 2010, pp 516-7.
  2. Doppman JL, Reinig JW, Dwyer AJ, et al.: Differentiation of adrenal masses by magnetic resonance imaging. Surgery 102 (6): 1018-26, 1987.
  3. Brown ED, Semelka RC: Magnetic resonance imaging of the adrenal gland and kidney. Top Magn Reson Imaging 7 (2): 90-101, 1995 Spring.
  4. Fassnacht M, Johanssen S, Quinkler M, et al.: Limited prognostic value of the 2004 International Union Against Cancer staging classification for adrenocortical carcinoma: proposal for a Revised TNM Classification. Cancer 115 (2): 243-50, 2009.
  5. Allolio B, Fassnacht M: Clinical review: Adrenocortical carcinoma: clinical update. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 91 (6): 2027-37, 2006.

Stage I Adrenocortical Carcinoma

Standard treatment options:

Treatment options under clinical evaluation:

Although adjuvant mitotane has shown some progression-free or disease-free survival advantage, there has been no overall survival advantage demonstrated thus far. [1] [2] [3]

Current Clinical Trials

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage I adrenocortical carcinoma. The list of clinical trials can be further narrowed by location, drug, intervention, and other criteria.

General information about clinical trials is also available from the NCI Web site.

References:

  1. Terzolo M, Angeli A, Fassnacht M, et al.: Adjuvant mitotane treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma. N Engl J Med 356 (23): 2372-80, 2007.
  2. Polat B, Fassnacht M, Pfreundner L, et al.: Radiotherapy in adrenocortical carcinoma. Cancer 115 (13): 2816-23, 2009.
  3. Sabolch A, Feng M, Griffith K, et al.: Adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy for adrenocortical carcinoma. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 80 (5): 1477-84, 2011.

Stage II Adrenocortical Carcinoma

Standard treatment options:

Treatment options under clinical evaluation:

Although adjuvant mitotane has shown some progression-free or disease-free survival advantage, there has been no overall survival advantage demonstrated thus far. [1] [2] [3]

Current Clinical Trials

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage II adrenocortical carcinoma. The list of clinical trials can be further narrowed by location, drug, intervention, and other criteria.

General information about clinical trials is also available from the NCI Web site.

References:

  1. Terzolo M, Angeli A, Fassnacht M, et al.: Adjuvant mitotane treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma. N Engl J Med 356 (23): 2372-80, 2007.
  2. Polat B, Fassnacht M, Pfreundner L, et al.: Radiotherapy in adrenocortical carcinoma. Cancer 115 (13): 2816-23, 2009.
  3. Sabolch A, Feng M, Griffith K, et al.: Adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy for adrenocortical carcinoma. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 80 (5): 1477-84, 2011.

Stage III Adrenocortical Carcinoma

Standard treatment options:

Treatment options under clinical evaluation:

  1. Clinical trials are appropriate for newly diagnosed patients when possible.

  2. Radiation therapy (approximately 50 to 70 Gy given over a period of 4 weeks) may be given to patients with localized but unresectable tumors. [1]

  3. For patients unable to undergo complete resection, mitotane in doses as high as 10 to 12 g per day to achieve a blood level of 14 to 20 mg/L should be considered. This adrenolytic drug produces useful clinical responses in about 20% to 30% of patients with measurable tumor burden. [2] [3]

    Two other cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens are suggested to be effective and have been compared in a phase III trial: [2]

    Furthermore, a substantial number of treated patients with functioning tumors will show diminution in hormone production. In cases of increased hormone production, antisteroidogenic drugs such as ketoconazole and metyrapone, and steroid receptor antagonists, such as spironolactone and mifepristone, should be considered.

    The role of mitotane as adjuvant therapy after complete tumor resection is still a matter of debate but should be discussed with the patient. In the case of complete resection, the role for adjuvant mitotane and radiation therapy is the same as for stage I and stage II adrenocortical carcinoma.


Current Clinical Trials

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage III adrenocortical carcinoma. The list of clinical trials can be further narrowed by location, drug, intervention, and other criteria.

General information about clinical trials is also available from the NCI Web site.

References:

  1. Percarpio B, Knowlton AH: Radiation therapy of adrenal cortical carcinoma. Acta Radiol Ther Phys Biol 15 (4): 288-92, 1976.
  2. Allolio B, Fassnacht M: Clinical review: Adrenocortical carcinoma: clinical update. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 91 (6): 2027-37, 2006.
  3. Terzolo M, Ardito A, Zaggia B, et al.: Mitotane. In: Hammer GD, Else T, eds.: Adrenocortical Carcinoma: Basic Science and Clinical Concepts. New York, Springer, 2010, pp 369-82.

Stage IV Adrenocortical Carcinoma

Temporary palliation of disseminated adrenocortical carcinomas can sometimes be achieved with the chemotherapeutic agent mitotane. Although measurable partial remissions are unusual and are reported in only 20% to 30% of cases, palliation of hormone symptoms is commonly observed. Prolonged treatment with mitotane, however, is often limited by gastrointestinal and neurologic toxicity. Local recurrences and selected sites of metastatic disease can sometimes be palliated surgically or with radiation therapy. [1] [2]

Two other cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens are suggested to be effective and have been compared in a phase III trial: [1]

Furthermore, a substantial number of treated patients with functioning tumors will show diminution in hormone production. In cases of increased hormone production, antisteroidogenic drugs, such as ketoconazole and metyrapone, and steroid receptor antagonists, such as spironolactone and mifepristone, should be considered.

Clinical trials are appropriate and should be considered whenever possible because phase I and II trials evaluate newer chemotherapeutic and biologic agents.

Standard treatment options:

  1. Chemotherapy with mitotane.
  2. Chemotherapy with mitotane plus streptozotocin or mitotane plus etoposide, doxorubicin, and cisplatin is used as part of the NCT00924144 phase III trial.
  3. Radiation therapy to bone metastases.
  4. Surgical removal of localized metastases, particularly those that are functioning.

Treatment options under clinical evaluation:

Several new agents are currently under investigation for unresectable adrenocortical cancer, including the following:

Trials of other chemotherapy regimens are also ongoing.

Current Clinical Trials

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage IV adrenocortical carcinoma. The list of clinical trials can be further narrowed by location, drug, intervention, and other criteria.

General information about clinical trials is also available from the NCI Web site.

References:

  1. Allolio B, Fassnacht M: Clinical review: Adrenocortical carcinoma: clinical update. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 91 (6): 2027-37, 2006.
  2. Terzolo M, Ardito A, Zaggia B, et al.: Mitotane. In: Hammer GD, Else T, eds.: Adrenocortical Carcinoma: Basic Science and Clinical Concepts. New York, Springer, 2010, pp 369-82.

Recurrent Adrenocortical Carcinoma

The question and selection of further treatment for patients with adrenocortical carcinoma depends on many factors, including previous treatment and site of recurrence as well as individual patient considerations. Local recurrence and selected sites of metastatic disease can sometimes be palliated by surgery or radiation therapy. Although none of these patients can be considered curable, palliation of hormonal symptoms and occasional 5-year survivals can be achieved. [1] Substantial morbidity, however, is associated with resection of these recurrent tumors.

Clinical trials are appropriate and should be considered whenever possible because phase I and II trials evaluate newer chemotherapeutic and biological agents.

Current Clinical Trials

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with recurrent adrenocortical carcinoma. The list of clinical trials can be further narrowed by location, drug, intervention, and other criteria.

General information about clinical trials is also available from the NCI Web site.

References:

  1. Jensen JC, Pass HI, Sindelar WF, et al.: Recurrent or metastatic disease in select patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Aggressive resection vs chemotherapy. Arch Surg 126 (4): 457-61, 1991.

Changes to This Summary (11/15/2012)

The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.

This summary was extensively revised.

This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

About This PDQ Summary

Purpose of This Summary

This PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about the treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.

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Changes to the summaries are made through a consensus process in which Board members evaluate the strength of the evidence in the published articles and determine how the article should be included in the summary.

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National Cancer Institute: PDQ Adrenocortical Carcinoma Treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Date last modified <MM/DD/YYYY>. Available at: http://cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/adrenocortical/HealthProfessional. Accessed <MM/DD/YYYY>.

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Date last modified: 2012-11-15

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